Junior Brain
(via https://twitter.com/Radio23/status/514594003476815873/photo/1)
The reasons behind her actions, however, are noble: it was all part of a university project, in which she wanted to show how Facebook activity is not necessarily reflective of real life. Speaking to media in her home country, she said: “I did this to show people that we filter and manipulate what we show on social media, and that we create an online world which reality can no longer meet. “My goal was to prove how common and easy it is to distort reality. Everybody knows that pictures of models are manipulated. But we often overlook the fact that we manipulate reality also in our own lives.

Yum

(Source: youtube.com)

(via The most terrifying gif I’ve ever seen. - Imgur)

(Source: youtube.com)

(Source: youtube.com)

TLDR

(Source: youtube.com)

Well, not much that conventional classical theory can do to help understand it. But there are “common practices” at work here - IOW, things that could be made into a “rock theory” of some kind (some of which might align quite closely with classical theory, some of which wouldn’t at all). Essentially it comes down to: what makes it sound the way it does? What is it that they’re doing that let’s you identify it as “rock music” to start with, and then as a subgenre of “heavy metal” (or whatever)? A lot of that is not to do with things like scales and chords anyway. It’s about volume, use of effects such as distortion, certain drum rhythms, vocal styles, etc. When it comes to the notes themselves, there’s a lot of unison riffs or power chords rather than triads or more complex harmony. So it’s kind of driven more by melody, rhythm and timbre than it is by harmony. And certainly by volume. (Try to imagine this song played by a string quartet. The notes would all be the same, but would you still call it “rock music”? Wouldn’t it lose a lot of its essence? That illustrates how (un)important the notes and chords, the things normally subject to theoretical analysis, are.) How much you (or we) want to develop all this into a body of theory is optional! Could be a nice academic exercise. But as with any music theory, it only ever describes things (in as much detail as you want) - it never explains. Even classical theory doesn’t “explain” classical music - any more than English grammar explains the English language. What it does is simply help us describe and analyse what we hear. Spot the patterns, the standard habits, the “common practices”.